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Personal Independence Payment

Personal Independence Payment

 

Part 1: Overview

Personal Independence Payment (PIP) started to replace Disability Living Allowance (DLA) from 8 April 2013 for people aged 16 to 64 with a long-term health condition or disability.

PIP helps with some of the extra costs caused by long-term ill-health or a disability. What you’ll get is not based on your condition, but how your condition affects you.

You’ll need an assessment to work out the level of help you get.

Your award will be regularly reassessed to make sure you’re getting the right support.

Help with PIP

Use the PIP checker to find out:

  • if and when PIP affects your DLA
  • when you can claim PIP

Most people getting DLA won’t be affected by PIP until 2015 or later.

You can contact a local support organisation to get help understanding PIP.

 

Part 2: What you’ll get

Personal Independence Payment (PIP) is usually paid every 4 weeks. It’s tax free and can be paid if you’re in or out of work.

It is made up of 2 components (parts). Whether you get 1 or both of these depends on how your condition affects you.

Daily living component

Daily living component Weekly rate
Standard £53
Enhanced £79.15

Mobility component

Mobility component Weekly rate
Standard £21
Enhanced £55.25

You’ll need an assessment to work out the level of help you’ll get. Your award will be regularly reassessed to make sure you’re getting the right support.

Terminal illness

If you’re not expected to live more than 6 months, you’ll get the enhanced daily living component. The rate of mobility component depends on your needs.

How you’re paid

All benefits, pension and allowances are paid into an account, eg your bank account.

Other help

You or your carer might also qualify for other financial help – eg Carer’s Allowance, Attendance Allowance or help with motoring, housing or transport costs.

 

Part 3: Eligibility

Personal Independence Payment (PIP) started to replace Disability Living Allowance (DLA) from 8 April 2013 for people aged 16 to 64 with a long-term health condition or disability.

To qualify for PIP, you must have a long-term health condition or disability and have difficulties with activities related to:

  • ‘daily living’ (see below)
  • mobility

You must have had these difficulties for 3 months and expect them to last for at least 9 months.

Terminal illness

You may also qualify if you’re terminally ill (ie not expected to live more than 6 months).

You can get PIP whether you are in work or not.

Daily living difficulties

You may get the daily living component of PIP if you need help with things like:

  • preparing or eating food
  • washing and bathing
  • dressing and undressing
  • reading
  • using the toilet
  • communicating
  • managing your medicines or treatments
  • making decisions about money

Mobility difficulties

You may get the mobility component of PIP if you need help with going out or moving around.

Assessments

You may get a letter telling you to go for an assessment by an independent health professional. The assessment is to help DWP work out the level of help you need. The letter will explain why and where you must go. 

DWP makes the decision about your claim based on the results of the assessment, your application and any supporting evidence you include.

Your award will be regularly reassessed to make sure you’re getting the right support. Tell DWP straight away if there’s a change in how your condition affects you.

 

Part 4: How to claim

Personal Independence Payment (PIP) started to replace Disability Living Allowance (DLA) from 8 April 2013 for people aged 16 to 64 with a health condition or disability.

If you get DLA

You don’t need to contact the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) about PIP now. You’ll have received a letter in early 2013 to tell you:

Most people getting DLA won’t be affected until 2015 or later. You may be affected earlier if your care or mobility needs change, or you reach the end of your existing DLA award.

Use the PIP checker to find out when your DLA will be affected.

You’ll need to apply for PIP when asked (even if you get an indefinite or lifetime DLA award).

When you apply, your DLA will continue until DWP makes a decision about your claim. If you decide not to apply, your DLA will end.

Turning 16 or 65

The change from DLA to PIP only affects you if we’re 16 to 64 from 8 April 2013.

Use the PIP checker to find out what happens to your DLA when you turn either 16 or 65.

New claims

PIP was introduced for new claims in parts of the north of England from 8 April 2013. It will be introduced nationwide from 10 June 2013.

Use the PIP checker to find out when you can make a new claim for PIP.

How to claim PIP

Contact DWP to claim PIP (see below) – it’s quicker to do this by phone.

When you call you might need the following:

  • contact details and date of birth
  • National Insurance number
  • bank or building society details
  • doctor’s or health worker’s name
  • details of any time spent abroad or in a care home or hospital

Someone else can call for you, but you’ll need to be there too.

You’ll be sent a form asking you to describe how your condition affects you.

You can describe your condition on both good and bad days, and when you’re doing different things.

You’ll need an assessment to work out the level of help you get.

New claims only
Telephone: 0800 917 2222
Textphone: 0800 917 7777
Monday to Friday, 8am to 6pm

Personal Independence Payment
PO Box 1303
Blackpool
FY1 9HF

General information
Telephone: 0845 850 3322
Textphone: 0845 601 6677
Monday to Friday, 8am to 6pm

 

Part 5: Appeals

Before you appeal

Before you appeal to the Tribunal, you need to ask the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) to look at the decision again. This is called ‘mandatory reconsideration’.

Mandatory reconsideration gives you the chance to let DWP know if anything’s changed, and gives DWP the chance to explain their decision.

Contact DWP by telephone or in writing, and make it clear why you’re asking for mandatory reconsideration. The telephone number and address will be on your decision letter.

You’ll receive a ‘mandatory reconsideration notice’ as a response.

Contact DWP as soon as possible if you think they’ve overlooked something or if your situation has changed.

How to appeal

You can appeal your decision if you’re still unhappy with DWP’s response in the mandatory reconsideration notice. You’ll need to include your mandatory reconsideration notice with the application.

Fill in ‘Notice of appeal against a decision of the Department for Work and Pensions – SSCS1’ and send it to the address on the form.

Download ‘Notice of appeal against a decision of the Department for Work and Pensions – SSCS1’ (PDF, 173KB)

 

Other relevant links

Permanent link to this article: http://operationfatherhood.org/dwp/personal-independence-payment/